Sunday Bulletins 2024

These are the PDF versions of the Sunday programs.  The best way to make use of these is to print them using 2 sided printing in landscape mode.

14 April 2024 3rd Sunday of Easter B

7 April 2024 2nd Sunday of Easter B

31 March 2024 Easter Sunday B

24 March 2024 Palm Sunday_B

17 March 2024 5th Sunday of Lent B

10 March 2024 4th Sunday of Lent B

3 March 2024 3rd Sunday of Lent B

25 February 2024 2nd Sunday of Lent B

18 February 2024 1st Sunday of Lent B

11 February 2024 6th Sunday in ordinary time B

4 February 2024 5th Sunday in ordinary time B

28 January 2024 4th Sunday in ordinary time B

21 January 2024 3rd Sunday in ordinary time B

14 January 2024 2nd Sunday in ordinary time B

7 January 2024 Epiphany B

Sunday Bulletins 2023

These are the PDF versions of the Sunday programs.  The best way to make use of these is to print them using 2 sided printing in landscape mode.

Sunday, 31 December 2023 Holy Family_B Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 24 December 2023 4th Sunday of Advent B Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 17 December 2023 3rd Sunday of Advent Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 10 December 2023 2nd Sunday of Advent Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 3 December 2023 1st Sunday of Advent Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 26 November 2023 Christ the King Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 19 November 2023 33rd Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 12 November 2023 32nd Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 5 November 2023 All Saints Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 29 October 2023 30th Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 22 October 2023 29th Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 15 October 2023 28th Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 8 October 2023 41st Sunday Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 1 October 2023 26th Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 24 September 2023 25th Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 17 September 2023 24th Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 10 September 2023 23rd Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 3 September 2023 22nd Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 27 August 2023 21st Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 20 August 2023 Assumption of Our Lady Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 13 August 2023 19th Sunday in ordinary time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 6 August 2023 Transfiguration of the Lord Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 30 July 2023 17th Sunday Ordinary Time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 23 July 2023 16th Sunday Ordinary Time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 16 July 2023 15th Sunday Ordinary Time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 9 July 2023 14th Sunday Ordinary Time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 2 July 2023 Sts. Peter and Paul Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 25 June 2023 12th Sunday Ordinary Time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 18 June 2023 11th Sunday Ordinary Time Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 11 June 2023 Body and Blood Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 4 June 2023 Holy Trinity Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 28 May 2023 Pentecost Sunday Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 21 May 2023 Ascension of the Lord Assumption Cathedral

Sunday, 14 May 2023 6th Sunday of Easter Assumption Cathedral

Sunday,  7 May 2023 5th Sunday of Easter Assumption Cathedral

We’re addicted to disturbance: Norway’s Bishop Varden

– Luke Coppen, The Pillar, August 2022

Bishop, what is Christianity?

Christianity fundamentally is faith in – and an existential attachment to – the revelation of Jesus Christ. By which I mean fundamentally his manifestation of our call to share in the very life of God, in his victory over death. Fundamentally, Christianity is the certainty that in Christ death has lost its sting. “Christ is risen” and everything else flows from that. There are enormous consequences, more or less simple or complex, that embrace all of existence.

What is prayer?

It’s the lifting up of the heart. It is an opening of my being to the reality of God and an engagement of my being with God’s being in a dialogue, which is sometimes an explicit dialogue and sometimes very implicit and mysterious.

There’s a marvelous story of Metropolitan Anthony Bloom. When he goes to an old people’s home, he encounters this old lady, who is in a great spiritual crisis, because she says she recites the Jesus Prayer day and night, and yet she is in this state of spiritual desert.  The Metropolitan advises her: “From now on, I ask you to spend half an hour a day not saying any prayers, but simply sitting in your chair and knitting in the face of God.”

It totally revolutionized this woman’s spiritual life.

Sometimes, if we could learn just to shut up and open ourselves attentively to God.

Is that what you’d call contemplative prayer?

I’ve been helped by a phrase from a Florentine Renaissance humanist, Pico della Mirandola, who speaks of our fundamental vocation as being “universi contemplator”, as one who contemplates the universe, who contemplates the whole.  I’m convinced that we, by nature, are contemplative. To live contemplatively is fundamentally a matter of standing still and paying attention.

There’s a contemplative hidden in everyone?

And not necessarily all that hidden. In our cultural context, there’s a lot that militates against the contemplative life because we’re addicted to disturbance. We love to be disturbed. And if we haven’t been disturbed for the last 20 seconds, we find something to disturb us. Part of the soul pain, frustration that experience can release in us is an indication that, fundamentally, we’re constructed for a different mode of interacting with the world.

Blaise Pascal said that ‘all of humanity’s problems stem from man’s inability to sit quietly in a room alone.’ There’s such wisdom in that.

Does the Church still have a need for contemplatives?

An urgent need, because the heart of the Church is a contemplative heart. We need that constant refocusing of our sight, of our mind, of our heart upon the mystery of God.

Easter Sunday: Rise heart; thy Lord is risen. – George Herbert

In the Acts of the Apostles, “when Peter says he is a witness to Jesus’ resurrection, he does
not only guarantee the truth of Christ’s rising – though that statement is itself momentous. What
lends force to his words is his assurance of the fact that Jesus, who was dead, is alive and
exerts a transformative influence beyond constraints of time and space. The world is forever
changed as a result. Peter’s life is changed. Your life too, he tells Cornelius (and us), can be
changed.”
(Erik Varden – Entering the Twofold Mystery – 2022, pp192-3).
Transformation is the key word. It is not an original insight to stress that the Gospel is a
transformative, living document of faith. The first Christians experienced first-hand the transformative
power of Jesus’ resurrection in their lives. Knowing the Risen Jesus, they were forever changed.
The same reality is true for us. Do we honestly believe that?
Sadly, some 2,000 years later, we can take too much for granted. We may too easily be born
into the Church, just passively receiving what we are told, thus missing the full message about who
we are as church, in relationship with God and each other. The basic fact is that the Gospel acts to
change our lives here and now, so that we may know God’s glory, thus becoming attuned to the full
possibilities of life. Do we appreciate this? I can understand if we don’t. No matter our reluctance
or reticence, our transformation into participating more fully in the divine life, here and now, is offered
to us through the resurrection.
Here the danger is I may just be theorising. So I will put it another way. I see this transformation
happening in little ways, in real ways, in the life of our own faith community. My honest experience
is that I see ‘spiritual enlightenment’ happening in our midst. I see the goodness of people and know
their generosity in reaching out to others who have less or suffer. I see people making decisions to
make something more of their lives, to live their faith more deeply and to make life commitments for
the sake of love, for the sake of others. I see people humbly placing their lives before a forgiving
God, being intent on making a fresh start.
Transformation is happening. The resurrection is real and happening today in Our Bangkok.
The Lord has risen, as he said he would. Easter unfolds God’s unending promise to every person
enjoying their true dignity, in the light of the resurrection. Nothing in this life can kill our Easter faith.
Thus, Alleluia is our song and we are an Easter people.
John P Murray osa

Baptism

The​ Geronimo and​ Veigas families​ presented​ their​ children​ for​ baptism​ on​ Sunday​ 12th December.​

We​ wish​ these​ families​ every​ blessing​ as​ we​ all​ journey​ together​ in​ faith.​

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